Presentation Styles.

Presenting to people with differing learning and communication styles.
Presentations often are very Auditory, strongly Visual or a combination of the two. Although the latter is better than the first presentation style – a number of people will not participate fully, nor will they be inspired and involved.
An Auditory presenter/ facilitator will often use wordy presentations, or flip chart statements to make their point. 
You will know that they are strong auditory communicators by the cleverness of their words, their stories and examples and the fact that they flip over the pages of their presentations/ flip chart pages once they have spoken of them.
They may be asked to “go back” to previous pages/ slides by visual learners.
They also love to teach by repeating their messages and live by the motto:- “Tell them once, and then tell them again and again.”
Their presentations sound brilliant to strong auditory learners, but can:-

a)    Bore visual learners with long-winded explanations. 
b)   Isolate Kinesthetic (experiential) learners by not physically involving them.
 

A Visual presenter will use visuals as much as they can. Some will be very detailed and intricate. They will normally display each visual/ flip chart on the walls, as they finish with it. This ensures that there is a long term reference for audience members. Their explanations are often brief and to the point, and they expect people to understand – from the graphic nature of presentation.
Their presentations are visual delights to strong Visual learners but can:-

a)    Isolate auditory learners with their focus on picture lessons and the limited focus on “talking it through.” 
b)   Isolate Kinesthetic (experiential) learners by not physically involving them.
 

Kinesthetic presenters will often get an example/ sample of the item under discussion, into the hands of the audience members. This ensures that they can touch, feel and experience it. Their words will have to do with the feel and experience. 
Their presentations feel good to strong Visual learners but can:-

a)    Isolate auditory learners with their focus on picture lessons and the limited focus on “talking it through.” 
b)   Isolate Visual Learners by not visually involving them.
 

The most important part of a strong presentation is to make sure that there is a “mixed grill” in terms of presentation styles.
12 steps to great presentations.
Presentations are verbal, sensory, visual and experiential. We must ensure that delegates have the opportunity to feel, hear, discuss, think, see, experience and intellectualise the lessons and information in the presentations.
1)   Our (not excessively long) speaking portion, must:-
2)   Have visual descriptions using colour words and audio pictures of place and things .
3)   Have heart and sensory words.
4)   Have power words, stories, sayings and examples.
5)   Ask feeling, seeing and hearing questions. How do you feel? Can you see what I am showing you? Do you hear/ understand the process thus far?
6)   Stories, sayings and examples
7)   Use numbered tips, such as: – “7 steps to having a great life.”
8)   And numbered steps to using a product, with step-by-step outcomes.
9)   These must be allied to visual media, graphics and pictures.
10) Actual examples, samples and working models should be distributed around the room, so that those who like to experiment can do so.
11)Copies of the slide show should either be handed out, or displayed on the walls. Anything written, or drawn on a flipchart page should be stuck around the room, on the walls – in order of presentation.
12)Time should be taken for interaction, discussions and for prodding, touching and experimenting with models, samples and examples. This will allow for an active question and answer session.
And a bonus:-
13)There should always be an element of fun in any presentation. 
In this way, everybody is involved. They will all feel as if you are presenting directly to them.
Enjoy. Touch some lives!
Brian Moore

22 July 2011
Celebrating Humanity International Communication, Learning, Diversity, Team Building and Team Conflict Resolution Specialists
info@africa-dreams.com
+27 79 643 4457
Arthie and Brian Moore
CelebratingHumanity International – Copyright
South Africa.
Email: info@africa-dreams.com
Website: www.africa-dreams.com
Mobile: +27 79 643 4457

Better relationships? Talk straight, clearly and with respect.

As the lift descended the two Zulu ladies made their observations of my well-rounded figure…
“Hawu! We sisi! Uwubonile umkhaba? (Gee Sister have you noticed the stomach.)
“Yebo, ngiwubonile. Yinkinsela yempela – sengathi inemali eningi!” (Yes, I have noticed it. Clearly a wealthy person – I’d imagine he has plenty of money)
All this gossip happened in front of me, as they innocently watched the floor indicator panel. I bided my time and as the two ladies prepared to leave the lift, I spoke to them in Zulu. “Sobuye sibonane bomama.” (I will see you ladies around some time.)
“Hawu! Hawu!” They squealed in shock. “We didn’t know that you could speak Zulu!”
The event reminded me of similar events where people use their “superior” use of language to make negative observations of people.
Many years ago I used the services of a UK born dentist. I had an afternoon session with him. I had earlier washed my mouth out at a supermarket rest-room after eating a sandwich for lunch. It was not enough. He peered into my mouth and pronounced to his assistant, “It is a foggy day in Liverpool.”
In his English way he had said that I had not brushed my teeth. I was very embarrassed and he lost me as a client and a number of others who I spoke to about the event.
In a recent training course my beautiful Hindu wife and I were subjected to abuse from a small group of England born delegates. In loud and profane tones they proceeded to malign the “Indians” and their “ability to speak the truth”. This in the round about and sarcastic manner of certain English people. Very little is said directly.
We are however well travelled and understood perfectly. As facilitators we have to be fair, pleasant and respectful to all of our delegates. Any mention of their meanness would reduce the programme to a series of personal attacks. It took us both a lot of internal and interpersonal talk to get close to our normal warm level of communication.
At an earlier course three of the many Afrikaners, on a Celebrating Humanity© course, walked into the conference venue and made similar attacks on Arthie and the programme itself. This time it was in Afrikaans. They too never believed that we could understand and speak their language. Their embarrassment was very visible as the programme unfolded with both of us speaking English, Zulu and Afrikaans.
Numerous African people from our many language groups speak of the way certain English speaking South Africans “Shaya ‘ma angles.” (To speak indirectly and in a round about way.) It is an old English habit to lighten the criticism and talk around a challenge, so as not to hurt feelings. Often the hurt is greater because no-one besides the speaker understands the true message until much later.
Some people find it necessary to joke in sexual manner. Their jokes are often below the belt and cause great embarrassment to their colleagues and friends who do not discuss these matters outside of their bedrooms. Most African and Eastern groups do not appreciate such jokes. Others try to get their laughs by bringing down “groups” of people. By race, by colour, by language, by religion and even by hair colour.
The message here is all about respect.
When we isolate ourselves into our common groups and use our cleverness to “secretly” or “publicly” attack others, we damage our ability to develop good working relationships. When we try not “to hurt others feelings”, we often cause more pain than we would have by straight talk and without rancour. When we use our own “language” to communicate our jealousy or meanness towards those who communicate in other languages, we often isolate ourselves. When we joke in a manner that is sexual or which brings down other people, we bring ourselves, the listeners and our country down.
We live in a wonderful multi-lingual, multi-cultural and multi-spiritual land. All of our people have a right to respect and dignity. All of us have a duty to be respectful and dignified. One huge step of our journey, to a united land, will take place when begin to tell funny jokes that do not demean, or disrespect other people. And another gigantic step will take place when we talk straight, talk clearly and talk with respect.
Celebrating Humanity International
trainers@africa-dreams.com
24 April 2004
Celebrating Humanity diversity training, diversity management and team building imageRequest a Team Building quotation, Diversity Training quotation
or Team Conflict Resolution proposal-“Never doubt that a small, group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has.” Margaret Mead.

Brian V Moore Website

Diversity Training in South Africa

Africa Dreams Website – Celebrating Humanity International

Celebrating Humanity Projects

Team Building in South Africa

Celebrating Humanity Blog

Celebrating Humanity on Facebook

Contact

Mobile: +27 (0)79 643 4457

Fax: +27 866 746 310
 

Team Conflict Resolution Options

The well-known Celebrating Humanity Team Conflict Resolution program has been designed to accommodate teams that are pressed for time and large organisations.
The Harvest program, with an initial 2.5 to 3 days session,  gives participants extra time to develop leadership, solutions to challenges and advanced communications skills.
The Mini Harvest program, with an initial 1.5 to 2 day session, is tightly adjusted to build the team in as short a time possible.
Both programs have the Values Circle Process to clear the past, get commitment and a peer-developed code of conduct – to guide the team into the future.
The follow-up processes and programs ensure long lasting and powerfully inclusive change.
Check out our website for more information. Or email Brian V Moore.
Request a Team Building, Diversity Training
or Team Conflict Resolution proposal
on http://www.celebrating-humanity-projects.com
or email: brian@africa-dreams.com
or call +27 79 643 4457

Check out our new blog on “How we Teach and Learn…”

Learning Styles, Communication Styles and Relationships

How your learning style affects your relationships and how you can get better results, yourself and with others.
Now that we know that we have a unique learning style, it is important to note that – as a result of that style – we also have unique ways of interacting, communicating, listening and behaving.

This impacts our relationships and our ability to build relationships with others. This impacts teams. companies and individuals.

Request a Team Building, Diversity Training
or Team Conflict Resolution proposal –
on http://www.celebrating-humanity-projects.com
or email: brian@africa-dreams.com
or call +27 79 643 4457