Living and Teaching Unity – Arthie and Brian Moore

Da Moores 2012 Arthie, Brian and Family‘Living and Teaching Unity’

An excerpt from: Golden Room.

Many cross cultural couples will readily include in their list of the benefits of being in a cross cultural relationship, the delight in being able to have two weddings that reflect their dual cultural heritage.But for Arthie and Brian Moore of South Africa, two weddings wasn’t quite enough to reflect, represent and celebrate this couple’s inspiring journey. They have in fact married each other seven times, and the second wedding was a surprise wedding!

Their story begins with a dream. The amazing and almost unbelievably accurate dream of a young girl in year seven at school, about the kind of man she wanted to marry. And the dream of a nation that it would one day be free from apartheid.Arthie grew up as a fourth generation Asian South African in a Hindu family classed as ‘Indian’..

Unusually her family came from divergent socio- economic backgrounds, with entrepreneurs on one side and fishermen and carpenters on the other side, her roots stemmed from indentured labourers from the Indian subcontinent.

From an early age Arthie’s family understood she was somewhat rebellious and determined, a person who knew exactly what she wanted and how to get it. For a school project Arthie wrote out her dreams where she described exactly who she would marry and what they would do with their lives together; her future husband would also be tall with blue eyes and blonde hair.

Perhaps her family only gave cursory attention to this detail. After all in the South Africa of this time White people and Asian, ‘Coloured’ and Black people had very little interaction. There were separate neighbourhoods, separate schools, separate churches, and separate sports leagues. In effect, just as the policy intended, -apartheid meaning separateness- the people of South Africa were separated in every conceivable way.

The ‘races’ of South Africa certainly did not intermarry. (more) via www.goldenroom.co.uk.

How to team build in a racially-culturally-and-personality-conflicted team – HR Pulse

Published on 15 Jan 2013 in HR PulseFor more articles relevant to the HR Community

Brian V Moore

In 2002, we were called in to Eskom by Bruce Moody, a high-level HR officer at Eskom. He said: “We have some heavy cultural clashes in a technical service centre in the Northern Province [now Limpopo].

Do you think that you can you do something to change the situation?”

“I am sure we can.” I responded. “What are the challenges?”

Bruce pondered for a while and said: “There are some heavy racial attitudes from all sides. In fact, I don’t really know why I am asking you! What are you, a white man and your Indian wife, going to do to make a difference? This is a bunch of tough hardliners. They have a long history of conflict and nothing that we have done has worked.

“Let’s get this clear: These are heavy workplace disputes!” said Bruce. “There is continuous backstabbing and gossiping. They complain that everything is wrong and nobody is to blame! They are totally unmotivated and their productivity is very low, which is resulting in poor customer service.”

Arthie, my wife and business partner, asked: “What do you think is causing this?”

Bruce gave Arthie a knowing look: “Well obviously there is very low morale among them because of the constant bickering. There is racism, prejudice, laziness, no ownership, no accountability and poor communication – and I mean REALLY poor!” He took a deep breath, shook his head, and continued: “This is a hugely conservative area where old attitudes die very hard. It could be the worst case that you could ever take on.”

I felt confident we could take on the challenge

We were almost overpowered by his statements, but I had no doubts. If I could work in areas, as a peacemaker, where bullets were flying, we could duck a few words.

“We can do this. When do you want us to start?” We were given two weeks to prepare.

We hit the ground running

We had to find ways to build relationships swiftly with groups of people who we had never before encountered in an area of the country where we had NO experience. We spent the time studying the history of the area, and the cultures and languages of the people in the team.

Arthie and I then put together the Celebrating Humanity Team Conflict Resolution programme for diverse teams. This fun, exciting, inclusive and enjoyable programme included celebrating diversity, diversity management, team building and a sustainable long-term team-managed code of conduct.

And so we set off to the town where the centre was located

As we drew closer to the centre, we passed a huge flock of vultures feeding on the carcass of a wild animal. I silently prayed that it was not an ominous sign!

When we arrived, Jan – the depot supervisor – greeted us. He then took us aside and pleaded: “You must just motivate them. They need it.” I looked at his stressed face and saw a man in pain. He was ready to explode. Another senior member of the team said: “If you guys mention racism, just once, we WILL walk out.”

We had to change the mood from the outset. We spent that night in the training room transforming the venue into one of celebration: Balloons, happy colours, hand-drawn posters and a very unique seating arrangement…

The next morning we found separated groups sitting together. They were grouped by colour, language and level. All in their own comfort zones. All spiritually, emotionally and physically apart. Some were obviously angry and others totally disinterested.

Then we began to help them to celebrate their humanity

Three days and 21 working hours later, the same people were sitting side by side at a family barbecue. Children played with children. Wives chatted to each other while the men cooked meat, spoke about cars, sport and laughed as they shared jokes.

They had experienced each other in a fun environment, shared wisdom, seen value in each other, worked as teams, cleared all of their past interpersonal baggage, committed to a code of positive behaviours and removing their negative actions from their lives.

15 months after the first intervention, Jan sent this feedback

“I had a group of 30 people from diverse cultures. They could not get on with each other:

There was continuous friction between the different race groups, and between people from the same race and cultural group. The people were negative and not satisfied with anything.

Complaints were the order of the day. This also placed our depot in a bad light with management.

We decided on Brian and Arthie’s training. The people were very negative about the programme initially.

As the course progressed, peoples’ attitudes changed from negative to positive.

Communication, respect and ownership improved from all sides by 100%. The respect between different race groups has been restored.

Some of the people who were negative have changed so much that they have been promoted to higher positions with greater responsibility.

The foundation of the entire course was so successful that the group is now going ahead with a leadership course.”

Now that was the change that we had been looking for!

via How to team build in a racially-culturally-and-personality-conflicted team – HR Pulse.

Presentation Styles.

Presenting to people with differing learning and communication styles.
Presentations often are very Auditory, strongly Visual or a combination of the two. Although the latter is better than the first presentation style – a number of people will not participate fully, nor will they be inspired and involved.
An Auditory presenter/ facilitator will often use wordy presentations, or flip chart statements to make their point. 
You will know that they are strong auditory communicators by the cleverness of their words, their stories and examples and the fact that they flip over the pages of their presentations/ flip chart pages once they have spoken of them.
They may be asked to “go back” to previous pages/ slides by visual learners.
They also love to teach by repeating their messages and live by the motto:- “Tell them once, and then tell them again and again.”
Their presentations sound brilliant to strong auditory learners, but can:-

a)    Bore visual learners with long-winded explanations. 
b)   Isolate Kinesthetic (experiential) learners by not physically involving them.
 

A Visual presenter will use visuals as much as they can. Some will be very detailed and intricate. They will normally display each visual/ flip chart on the walls, as they finish with it. This ensures that there is a long term reference for audience members. Their explanations are often brief and to the point, and they expect people to understand – from the graphic nature of presentation.
Their presentations are visual delights to strong Visual learners but can:-

a)    Isolate auditory learners with their focus on picture lessons and the limited focus on “talking it through.” 
b)   Isolate Kinesthetic (experiential) learners by not physically involving them.
 

Kinesthetic presenters will often get an example/ sample of the item under discussion, into the hands of the audience members. This ensures that they can touch, feel and experience it. Their words will have to do with the feel and experience. 
Their presentations feel good to strong Visual learners but can:-

a)    Isolate auditory learners with their focus on picture lessons and the limited focus on “talking it through.” 
b)   Isolate Visual Learners by not visually involving them.
 

The most important part of a strong presentation is to make sure that there is a “mixed grill” in terms of presentation styles.
12 steps to great presentations.
Presentations are verbal, sensory, visual and experiential. We must ensure that delegates have the opportunity to feel, hear, discuss, think, see, experience and intellectualise the lessons and information in the presentations.
1)   Our (not excessively long) speaking portion, must:-
2)   Have visual descriptions using colour words and audio pictures of place and things .
3)   Have heart and sensory words.
4)   Have power words, stories, sayings and examples.
5)   Ask feeling, seeing and hearing questions. How do you feel? Can you see what I am showing you? Do you hear/ understand the process thus far?
6)   Stories, sayings and examples
7)   Use numbered tips, such as: – “7 steps to having a great life.”
8)   And numbered steps to using a product, with step-by-step outcomes.
9)   These must be allied to visual media, graphics and pictures.
10) Actual examples, samples and working models should be distributed around the room, so that those who like to experiment can do so.
11)Copies of the slide show should either be handed out, or displayed on the walls. Anything written, or drawn on a flipchart page should be stuck around the room, on the walls – in order of presentation.
12)Time should be taken for interaction, discussions and for prodding, touching and experimenting with models, samples and examples. This will allow for an active question and answer session.
And a bonus:-
13)There should always be an element of fun in any presentation. 
In this way, everybody is involved. They will all feel as if you are presenting directly to them.
Enjoy. Touch some lives!
Brian Moore

22 July 2011
Celebrating Humanity International Communication, Learning, Diversity, Team Building and Team Conflict Resolution Specialists
info@africa-dreams.com
+27 79 643 4457
Arthie and Brian Moore
CelebratingHumanity International – Copyright
South Africa.
Email: info@africa-dreams.com
Website: www.africa-dreams.com
Mobile: +27 79 643 4457

Brian Moore – Speaker



Brian V Moore, International Speaker and Facilitator Extraordinaire! Brian V Moore, international speaker and facilitator, is the  Managing Director of Celebrating Humanity International (formerly Mthimkhulu International.

He is a Zambian born South African , of Irish descent , brought up in Port Shepstone and adopted by a Zulu Tribe.

He speaks several languages fluently, including English, Zulu and Afrikaans. He currently greets in more than 60 other languages.He received a Community Builder Award from Archbishop Desmond Tutu for his contribution to bringing peace to the once troubled Dusi Canoe Marathon.

Brian is the key founder and co-creator of the Celebrating Humanity Diversity Training, Team Building and Team Conflict Resolution Programmes. His vision, focus and commitment toward Transformational Team Building has transformed lives across the board and instills a new sense of hope for all who attend his courses and presentations. Known traditionally as “Mthimkhulu, or Bhungane”, in the Zulu community, he has lived an incredibly full South African and African life – and is filled with passion for Africa and its peoples.

He is the author of an e-book, titled, “Team Conflict Resolution Strategies”, which is currently used locally and internationally i.e. USA, UK, Australia and South Africa. He has a great depth of knowledge and experience in business, customer care, conflict resolution, communication, cultures, diversity, relationships, traditions and traditional proverbs.

Brian was recently the guest speaker and Chairman of the World Learning Summit in Hong Kong in February 2009. He was also the Business Sponsor and Speaker at the Annual Diversity Conference held in London.

He has spoken and facilitated change with thousands of people in Zambia, Namibia, Swaziland, Hong Kong, Rhode Island – USA, Connecticut – USA and across South Africa.

Brian’s storytelling, ability to involve his audiences and his tremendously human touch will delight, wow and entice multi-diverse audiences to see diversity at a much different and deeper level.

Brian is willing and able to travel anywhere in the World, to enchant your people!

Experience the Magic!